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The African American Experience in Louisiana
From the Civil War to Jim Crow

Charles Vincent (editor)
Hardcover
booksXYZ price: $45.00
$2.25 of your order (5%) will be donated to the school of your choice.

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BOOK SUMMARY
The second volume revealing the pivotal role of Louisiana African Americans in state & national history.

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BOOK SYNOPSIS
People of African descent have had an enigmatic experience in Louisiana. Their presence and contributions have been major components in the state's history despite the fact that they have not been widely acknowledged. In a sense, blacks have been the unsung heroes of Louisiana's history. Their lives have been characterized by such themes as the struggle for survival, resistance to oppression, advancement against odds, artistic and literary triumphs, unity and upward mobility. The task of demanding America be "America for all of its citizens" has an endearing and solid history among blacks in Louisiana. Many of the most significant landmark events in race relations in the nation's history have occurred in Louisiana.

This volume, edited by Charles Vincent, professor of History at Southern University, provides the most comprehensive view to date of this stirring saga. Vincent's compilation concentrates on the most recent scholarly works. The work's component essays are presented in chronological order, and they detail events from the Civil War to the end of the nineteenth century. Confronting the most pivotal event in the country's history, the Civil War, blacks welcomed an end to slavery and a new beginning for the state and nation. Though no longer slaves, a more uncertain and precarious lifestyle would burden African Americans after the war. Reconstruction, and Redemption. The enigmatic experience of the African American in Louisiana during slavery would continue throughout the remainder of the nineteenth century.

Order a copy today and begin exploring the long-ignored story of the African American community's origins, development, and contributions to the Pelican State's history.

Volume XI Part B of the Louisiana Purchase Bicentennial Series in Louisiana History

BOOK EXCERPTS
CONTENTS

SECTION I CIVIL WAR: THE FIGHT FOR LIBERATION

Confederate Slavery
by Peter Ripley

Negro Troops in Blue and Gray: The Louisiana Native Guards, 1861-1863
by Mary F. Berry

Black Violence and White Response: Louisiana, 1862
by William F. Messner

The Vicksburg Campaign of 1862: A Case Study in the Federal Utilization of Black Labor
by William F. Messner

"I Regard It as an Experiment"
[The Native Guards at the Siege of Port Hudson]
by James G. Hollandsworth, Jr.

Unsuited for This Duty
by James G. Hollandsworth, Jr.

Patriotism Frustrated: The Native Guards of Confederate Natchitoches
by Gary B. Mills

"We'll Hang Jeff Davis on the Sour Apple Tree": Civil War Era Slave Resistance in Louisiana
by Junius P. Rodriguez

Origins of Negro Suffrage During the Civil War
by Herman Belz

SECTION II RECONSTRUCTION: THE STRUGGLE FOR FULL CITIZENSHIP

Black Louisianians During the Civil War and Reconstruction
by Charles Vincent

Land, Labor, and Capital
by John W. Blassingame

Labor, The General Merchant, and the Crop Lien
by Joe Gray Taylor

Aspects of the Family and Public Life of Antoine Dubuclet
Louisiana's Black State Treasurer, 1868-1878
by Charles Vincent

Local Black Elected Officials in Ascension Parish (1868-1878)
by Robert E. Moran

The Policy of Violence in Caddo Parish, 1865-1884
by Gilles Vandal

The Knights of the White Camelia and the Election of 1868:
Louisiana's White Terrorists; a Benighting Legacy
by James G. Dauphine

Race and Violence in Reconstruction New Orleans: The 1868 Riot
by Melinda Meek Hennessey

"Forty Acres and a Mule": Louisiana and the Southern Homestead Act
by Claude F. Oubre

Black Education in Civil War and Reconstruction Louisiana:
George T. Ruby, the Army and the Freedmen's Bureau
by Barry A. Crouch

Marshall Harvey Twitchell and the Freedmen's Bureau in Bienville Parish
by Ted Tunnell

"Redeeming of the People from Ignorance"
by Howard Ashley White

Desegregation in New Orleans Public Schools during Reconstruction
by Louis R. Harlan

A Pioneer Protest: The New Orleans Street-Car Controversy of 1867
by Roger A. Fischer

Country Parish Schools, 1868-1877
by Roger A. Fischer

Louisiana Landholding During War and Reconstruction
by William E. Highsmith

SECTION III POST RECONSTRUCTION: THE STRUGGLE FOR SURVIVAL WITH HUMANITY

Antebellum Free Persons of Color in Postbellum Louisiana
by Loren Schweninger

Politics and Violence in Bourbon Louisiana: The Loreauville Riot of 1884 as a Case Study
by Gilles Vandal

Black Protest and White Power
by William Ivy Hair

Any Place But Here: Kansas Fever in Northeast Louisiana
by Joe Louis Caldwell

1208 Saratoga Street
by William Ivy Hair

Turning Points: Biracial Unions in the Age of Segregation, 1893-1901
by Eric Amesen

Race Relations in Louisiana, 1877-98
Henry C. Dethloffand Robert R. Jones

Black and White in New Orleans: A Study in Urban Race Relations, 1865-1900
by Dale A. Somers

A Selective List for Further Reading

SUGGESTED LINKS
Center for Louisiana Studies

BOOK REVIEWS
See Part A: From Africa to the Civil War and Part C: From Jim Crow to Civil Rights

View other titles from The Center for Louisiana Studies


MORE BOOK INFO
ISBN: 1887366377
ISBN(13-digit): 9781887366373
Copyright: 2000
Library of Congress: 96-84494
Book Publisher: Center for Louisiana Studies
Binding: Sewn
No. of Pages: 552





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